Happy Christmas

The best Christmas present I got this year came courtesy of the state of Virginia, in which Rick Perry and Newt Gingrich both failed to collect the necessary 10,000 signatures to get on the primary ballot. Virginia’s requirements are stringent– at ~10% of the number of last election’s primary voters probably too stringent to be democratically appropriate–but this is the case that demonstrates yet again that the presidential primary process is about ground organization, not just about getting lots of media attention. Lack of organization was what caused Newt’s campaign team to quit en masse earlier in the year, and obviously he hasn’t yet learned his lesson. Meanwhile Perry’s campaign is complaining that the requirements are “unrealistic,” apparently not noticing that the Romney and Paul campaigns really managed to meet those standards.

Someone who can’t organize a ground campaign to get 10,000 signatures may not be well suited to managing the executive branch of the U.S. government. and it’s a treat to see these fools who think they can rely just on media attention and their own charisma get their comeuppances.

Merry Christmas and a happy new year indeed!

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About J@m3z Aitch

J@m3z Aitch is a two-bit college professor who'd rather be canoeing.
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11 Responses to Happy Christmas

  1. Scott Hanley says:

    Gingrich’s campaign has said it will pursue an aggressive write-in campaign, but Virginia doesn’t allow write-ins on primary ballots.

    Sounds like exactly the sort of thing the Gingrich campaign wouldn’t know.

  2. Phil says:

    Who foots the bill for the primary elections when they are partisan?

    Michigan, as you know, does not have a partisan primary; but, anyone can vote for any candidate in the primaries regardless of party affiliation. The taxpayer foots the bill for Michigan’s primary electuions.

  3. James Hanley says:

    Phil,

    Good question, to which I don’t know the answer off the top of my head. The answer may vary by state.

  4. Phil says:

    You should see the movie, Melancholia, and do a series on that. It’s a very important issue in today’s society. I think you could get a lot of viewers.

  5. James Hanley says:

    Hmm, reviewing a movie about depression might be a bit risky for me. I’ll consider it, though, as the movie has strong reviews on the indispensable Rotten Tomatoes.

  6. Phil says:

    You will not go wrong reviewing Melancholia. The movie is chock full of abstactions about our current situation here in America. I think PBS did a series called, When Worlds Collide, and it helps give insight.

    Great movie. The guy that did it is a geniius.

  7. AMW says:

    it’s a treat to see these fools who think they can rely just on media attention and their own charisma get their comeuppances.

    Back at PL, or The One Best Way, or somewhere, I remember reading a post about how Obama and McCain had both failed to follow the proper procedure to get their names on the Texas ballot. Unsurprisingly, their uppance never came, and both were granted exceptions.

    So bask in these small victories, because the big ones never seem to materialize.

  8. James K says:

    That’s the trouble AMW, more often than not the harsh registration requirements are just there to ensure the “wrong sort” of people don’t get on the ballot. In New Zealand you only need 2 signatures to get on the ballot as a candidate, and even parties only need 500 financial members to be registered.

  9. James Hanley says:

    AMW,

    Indeed, both failed to register for the ballot in a timely manner, but were granted “of course” exceptions that no third party would have been granted.

  10. James Hanley says:

    Update: Virginia pols, both Dem and Rep, are now looking at changing the rules in time to let more candidates onto the primary ballot (in March). Surprise, surprise.

  11. Update: Virginia pols, both Dem and Rep, are now looking at changing the rules in time to let more candidates onto the primary ballot (in March). Surprise, surprise.

    Sorry to hear about the grinch. Still, merry Christmas!

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