Democracy Symposium

The League of Ordinary Gentleman is hosting its second symposium, on democracy (the first being the equality symposium kick-started by yours truly). The mobilizing question (which will be adhered to precisely as closely or loosely as each author chooses) is, “Is liberal democracy viable?”

Guest posts are invited. If I can find the time, I plan to write about aggregation problems in democracy. I think it would be great to have someone write about adverse selection problems, or voter irrationality (AMW, you out there?). But if you have some other issue about democracy that you’re just dying to lecture everyone about discuss, check out the call for posts.

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About J@m3z Aitch

J@m3z Aitch is a two-bit college professor who'd rather be canoeing.
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8 Responses to Democracy Symposium

  1. Pinky says:

    An uninformed electorate does not a democracy make.

  2. Matty says:

    You mean should not, an uniformed electorate is one of the defining features of societies that call themselves democratic.

  3. Matty says:

    I should add that while I am sceptical that democracy delivers the best interests of the majority or otherwise works as advertised I’m not aware of another system of government with a better record on protecting human rights so my vote is still for voting.

  4. Lancifer says:

    “…so my vote is still for voting.”

    Nice turn of a phrase Matty.

    I would vote for a benevolent dictatorship…so long as I was the dictator.

    Speaking of which Meles Zanawi, the dictator of my wife’s native Ethiopia, is ill and rumored to be dead. Perhaps I should put in my resume.

  5. AMW says:

    I’m out here at the moment. I’ll be back to my old digs come Thursday, but there’s some writing I need to catch up on. Most likely no contribution from me this time around.

  6. Matty says:

    I would vote for a benevolent dictatorship…so long as I was the dictator.

    I wonder if there’s ever been a dictator who didn’t see himself as benevolent.

    Speaking of which Meles Zanawi, the dictator of my wife’s native Ethiopia, is ill and rumored to be dead. Perhaps I should put in my resume.

    Just what kind of jobs are you going for? Incidentally I’m told that in China there is a tradition going back to the first emperor that if a leader dies and there is any uncertainty about the succession the common people will be told the old leader is still alive right up to the point a new leader is ready to make a public appearance.

  7. James Hanley says:

    Lance–If you need a letter of recommendation, just let me know.

    AMW–Man, you know how to hurt a guy, don’t you. Wish I was there, too.

  8. Lancifer says:

    Matty,

    in China there is a tradition going back to the first emperor that if a leader dies and there is any uncertainty about the succession the common people will be told the old leader is still alive right up to the point a new leader is ready to make a public appearance.

    That seems to be a foot in Ethiopia. Zenawi has not been seen or heard from in weeks, but the official word is that he is doing fine in a hospital in Belgium.

    Meles Zanawi has been a mixed bag for Ethiopia. Although he tolerates no dissent and has imprisoned and killed anyone that attempts to oppose him he has not been a typical corrupt and greedy African “strong man”.

    My friends and family in Ethiopia are fearful of the outcome of a power vacuum should Zanawi be declared dead.

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