Messiah Isn’t a Name

You’ve probably heard by now about the judge who changed a baby’s name from Messiah to Martin in resolution of a naming dispute between estranged parents, but the brouhaha isn’t complete until I’ve bitched about it.

“The word messiah is a title, and it’s a title has only been earned by one person, and that one person is Jesus Christ,” [the judge] told WBIR-TV in an interview from her office, which had a ceramic figurine of Joseph and Mary with baby Jesus on her desk. A copy of the Ten Commandments hung on the wall.

The arrogant idiocy of this judge deserves all the sharp rebuke it’s received times ten.

First, in America we do not have approved baby names lists.

Second, the kind of overbearing government that tells you what you can and can’t name your baby is exactly not the small government that conservatives like.

Third, what’s the basis for saying a title can’t be a names? Apparently this judge is unfamiliar with Major Major. Ok, that’s just from literature, so of course she’s unfamiliar with it. But it’s not exactly a new concept.

Fourth, in what world does she live that she thinks she has authority under the Constitution to make religious decrees from the bench? Would anyone like to start a pool on how long it takes before this ruling is overturned?

I’m reaching the end of my rope on this kind of nonsense. I don’t care one way or the other about anyone’s religious beliefs, and I don’t want to shut them up about their beliefs or bar them from offce. But I do want this type of Christian to come to grips with the reality that the U.S. isn’t a Christian theocracy, and to stop trying in all these myriad ways to enforce their religion on everyone.

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About James Hanley

James Hanley is Associate Professor of Political Science at Adrian College and a Fellow of the Institute for Social Policy and Understanding. The views expressed here do not reflect the views of either organization.
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10 Responses to Messiah Isn’t a Name

  1. lancifer666 says:

    But I do want this type of Christian to come to grips with the reality that the U.S. isn’t a Christian theocracy, and to stop trying in all these myriad ways to enforce their religion on everyone.

    A worthy goal, but I wouldn’t hold my breath. The fact that Indiana offers a free “In God we trust” license plate, and there is not even a rumble from the media let alone a court challenge is evidence that these Christians are correct in thinking that they can impose their religious beliefs on (at least) American society

  2. J@m3z Aitch says:

    free “In God we trust

    If price is an indicator of quality, I’d have doubts about how much I could really trust him.

  3. Matty says:

    The Judge is named Ballew, which may in fact be a title derived from the medieval lords of Ballew in Normandy. I trust she will be changing it immediately.

  4. Murali says:

    Its at times like these that I miss TVD. Because, all we have now is just amens here. Sometimes we want the guy who will defend the indefensible only because it makes for rousing debates.

  5. J@m3z Aitch says:

    Shhh. Naming calls,

  6. Matty says:

    Messiah, here Messiah

  7. AMW says:

    A list of names that are also titles, off the top of my head:

    Marshall*
    Rex
    King
    Duke
    Earl
    Thane

    *I’m glad that judge didn’t have a say in my naming. This one is the “M” in “AMW.” On second thought, I’ve never liked my middle name, so I wish that judged *did* have a say in it.

  8. Murali says:

    A lot of Indian names are also one of God’s names. For example, Muralidharan (which is my name) is another name for Lord Krishna.

  9. J@m3z Aitch says:

    Sorry, Murali, we are not singing “My Sweet Lord” to you. The best we’ll promise is to collectively say “Oh, my god,” each time you comment. ;)

  10. Murali says:

    Sorry, Murali, we are not singing “My Sweet Lord” to you.

    Infidel!

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